The Orbit - Innisfil

A giant development proposed along the GO Train line in Innisfil. This mega-project is slated to pave over farmland and radically change how Innisfil grows for decades to come. It will also place a great burden on nearby Lake Simcoe.

What's Happening?

In Innisfil, the proponent of a controversial development, The Orbit, has successfully sought backing from council to seek a Minister’s Zoning Order, or MZO, from the province.

If the province grants this request the developer gets a short cut through rules meant to ensure the public is consulted, environmental impacts are studied, and financial consequences understood.

Issuing a MZO effectively eliminates public input and reduces oversight into the net benefit of a development.

Innisfil council should affirm the principle that the voice of residents – your voice – matters when its comes to how their community develops, and require developers to follow the rules in place without any shortcuts.

Quick Facts

150,000 People

Paving Over Farmland

≠ Urban Growth Centre

Why is it a concern?

The Orbit is a concern, and should be given due process and careful consideration, given its size, scale, and location.
A map view of where The Orbit is proposed to be built. Natural features are overlaid.
A map view of where The Orbit, outlined in white, is proposed to be built. Natural features are overlaid. Click for a larger version.
On paper it seems great — a development focused on high density living, where people are close to amenities, including public transportation to major urban centres.
 
The glaring question, however, is why here — why should a development for 150,000 additional people be located in what is currently a largely rural area?
 
It seems the only reason this location is being pushed is the developer owns the land and wants to turn a profit, otherwise it makes absolutely no sense.
 
Given these concerns, this request for a MZO can be seen as an attempt to avoid uncomfortable questions that might be raised by going through due process and engaging in public consultation.
 
If a development is a net benefit to the community then developers can easily demonstrate that by engaging with those who it will most impact, namely the public and residents of the community.
 
We need more public engagement and participation in determining how our communities develop, not less.

How Can You Get Involved?

  1. Use our MZO action page to tell elected representatives of your concerns regarding their use.
  2. Write a letter to local papers outlining your concern with the development.
  3. Use our sign up form, below, to get updates on environmental issues, including The Orbit, happening in Innisfil.

Links to Further Reading

Help us fight MZO requests.
Send a message to your council and MPP, and report MZOs in your community.
Click Here

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150,000 People

Paving Over Farmland

≠ Urban Growth Centre